Some thoughts on multitasking

Jack Vinson has had several posts of late on the evils of multi-tasking and the unfortunate (yet seemingly unavoidable) and relentless march toward more and more multi-tasking. This comes from management styles, focus on action, and indeed the technologies we use. Jack’s post today started me on a blog journey that resulted in several other […]

Lead – don’t manage – your (autistic) kids

Autonomy  –  Mastery  –   Purpose Aimed at adults who have already heard the starting gun, these are three things that Malcolm Gladwell (Outliers) and Dan Pink (Drive) have written about in terms of meaningful work and a meaningful life. These are also incredibly important parts of growing up. As infants and toddlers, the focus […]

It’s not about easy; thoughts on a world without e-mail

I’ve been following Luis Suarez’ (@elsua) thoughts on a world without e-mail for quite a while now. His arguments have always made sense, and yet I’ve always had this nagging feeling of, “Yeah, but….” Last week I had a chance to view/listen to a recent presentation Luis gave about making the jump from e-mail to social […]

Music, movies, and higher education

Music. Movies. Higher education. What do these three things have in common? A solid entrenchment in the ‘good old days’ and an incredible unwillingness to engage the present, much less the future, of their industries. At least that’s the impression I have a little more than halfway through Anya Kamenetz’s latest book, “DIY U: Edupunks, […]

Ignore everybody (but don’t ignore this book)

Like Rework (which I reviewed last week), Ignore Everybody is my kind of book. Written by Hugh MacLeod of gapingvoid.com, it is made up of 40 short essays that each dive into a very specific idea or question. And pictures, lots of pictures from the cube-grenade gallery at gapingvoid.com. Based on many years of experience, […]

Autism and “Drive”

Most autism interventions focus on making the child “more normal” or “less autistic”, and this is where many of the problems come in. (I’m sure parents who try to make their “geeky” kids more athletic or their “jocks” more academic run into basically the same problem.) Earlier this year I read (and reviewed) Dan Pink’s […]

Kids, sacrifice, and the master’s journey

I don’t remember exactly where I read this, and I’m paraphrasing a bit, but this little anecdote captures the essence of mastery, and the sacrifice that often goes with it: A world class, and world famous, dancer was approached by an excited fan following a performance. “You were fantastic!” the fan said. “I’d give half […]

There’s always something to learn

On the TV show NCIS the main character, Special Agent Gibbs, has two primary passions: catching bad guys and building boats. Not just any kind of boat, but hand made wooden sailboats. Which he builds in his basement. (A running gag on the show is the question of how he gets the boats out of […]

Expertise, opportunity, and legacy are key to success (a review of “Outliers”)

I had been meaning to read Malcolm Gladwell’s Outliers: The Story of Successever since it was first published just over a year ago. Since a lot of the discussion of the book focused on the “10,000 hour rule” for achieving expertise, or mastery, it seemed a perfect fit for my interests. I’m still surprised that […]