The Fallacy of “ADA Compliance” and Technical Standards

“Technical compliance does not equate to a positive user experience, and has immense limitations in achieving an experience that is accessible to users with disabilities.”

Happy to have found Matt’s new blog.

Matt Vitale's Accessibility Blog

Alright folks, first, I’d like to address the term “ADA Compliant.” Last year, the Department of Justice withdrew plans for implementing technical accessibility requirements to the web sites of public entities under Title II of ADA, citing the need for more information on the appropriateness of setting requirements for small public entities, the costs and benefits of web accessibility, and additional measures.

“When it comes to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the dirty secret is that there are no specific technical requirements for any website. There are no standards which apply to the ADA and unless you’re a State or Local Government, there is no specific reference to website accessibility.”

Karl Groves

Consequently, a digital product cannot be labeled as “ADA compliant,” because there is no technical standard that applies. Among the number of laws in the United States that prohibit discrimination on the basis of disability, the only accessibility-specific…

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Invisible history

Some terrific insights here.

“A lot of the time, when autistic people complain that autistic characters are unrealistic, it’s presumed to be an issue of a character not representing the traits or experiences of a certain faction of the autistic community, and we get responses like “But one character can never represent all autistic people.”

But that isn’t the problem. It’s not that they’re not exactly like ourselves; it’s that they have no depth or complexity because they have no lived experience, because their creators didn’t know how to give them one.”

Chavisory's Notebook

I started watching Westworld last week. In a scene in the first episode, one of the android characters, a “host” in the immersive Wild West-themed amusement park, has found a photograph in his field, discarded by a guest, depicting a woman in modern clothing standing in Times Square at night. Disturbed and confused, he shows it to his daughter, Dolores, but she’s not similarly affected (at least, not yet).

Lacking any possible context or way to make sense of what she sees, she can only say over and over again, “It doesn’t look like anything to me.”

She can’t process the possible existence of a whole reality that she has no framework at all in which to understand.

With the premieres recently of both Atypical and The Good Doctor, I was having a conversation about fictional representation of autistic characters–what we wish we saw more of, what we find…

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Companies and superlinear scaling

I am about 100 pages into Geoffrey West’s book, Scale, and am having a hard time not just skipping ahead to the parts about cities and companies.

scale

Cities, West says, scale superlinearly (aka increasing returns to scale) whereas companies scale sublinearly (aka economy of scale). Which is why cities typically last a long time, and companies (and animals, for that matter) typically die young.

What if you could structure your company to scale superlinearly? Is it possible? If so, how would you go about making that happen? Would you even want it to happen, or is it a good thing that companies “die” young?

Back to the book….

 

Dear PMs, It’s time to Rethink Agile at Enterprise Startups

Eisenhower knew that any plan crafted before battle would be obsolete at first contact with the enemy. In his work, Kavazovic wants to be this realistic too. “Translating this into tech: no long-term plan or product vision survives contact with the user in the product-design sense. That’s why agile methodology is specifically designed to create user experiences that work,” he says. “It’s absolutely suboptimal to design a particular product all the way down to years’ worth of features, make that the blueprint, and build it out.” Inevitably, sticking to a rigid long-term plan without a mechanism to iterate on user feedback would result in features users don’t want, costly re-dos and potentially total product failure.

Source – Dear PMs, It’s time to Rethink Agile at Enterprise Startups

Division in the Autism Community – what next for us?

“It’s very hard for members of the three groups to find common ground.  People tend to see autism through the lens of personal experience.  An autistic college student who has trouble with organization and social skills is likely to view autism very differently from a parent whose child is non verbal, cognitively disabled, and self injurious. ”

Source – Division in the Autism Community – what next for us?